September12014

Hey 5 am.. I’ve been up the last few hours tossing, turning, and trying to smoke myself to sleep. My body’s really confused about why there hasn’t been any alcohol to metabolize for the last two days and is throwing a tantrum..

Has anyone ever tried to stop, uh, being an alcoholic? When should my body reestablish balance?

I’ve noticed that a major obstacle to quitting before has always been that society keeps demanding my presence even when I need a break for personal care. I need to sleep but I also need to be a person again soon.

(Also, this society fucking sucks, everyone’s depressed, and drinking’s always been a crutch and coping mechanism)

August302014

mylifeaskriz:

ruineshumaines:

Liz Climo on Tumblr.

this really cheered me up

(via exalted-homeboy)

1PM
exalted-homeboy:

yes this every semester.

aww, every few weeks for me I’d say

exalted-homeboy:

yes this every semester.

aww, every few weeks for me I’d say

(Source: crouchingtigerhiddendragqueen)

1PM
thepeoplesrecord:

How Trayvon Martin’s death launched a new generation of black activismAugust 29, 2014 | Mychal Denzel Smith | The Nation
On July 13, 2013, George Zimmerman was found not guilty in the murder of Trayvon Martin, an unarmed African-American 17-year-old walking home from a 7-Eleven. What The Washington Post and other media outlets had dubbed “the trial of the century” was over, with a deeply unsettling verdict. In the fifteen months between Trayvon’s death and the beginning of the trial, people across the country had taken to the streets, as well as to newspapers, television and social media, to decry the disregard for young black lives in America. For them—for us—this verdict was confirmation.
A group of 100 black activists, ranging in age from 18 to 35, had gathered in Chicago that same weekend. They had come together at the invitation of Cathy J. Cohen, a professor of political science at the University of Chicago and the author of Democracy Remixed: Black Youth and the Future of American Politics, and her organization, the Black Youth Project. Launched in 2004, the group was born as a research project to study African-American youth; in the decade since then, Cohen has turned the BYP into an activist organization. The plan for this meeting was to discuss movement building beyond electoral politics. Young black voters turned out in record numbers in the 2008 and ‘12 elections: 55 percent of black 18-to-24-year-olds voted in 2008, an 8 percent increase from 2004, and while a somewhat smaller number—49 percent—voted in 2012, they still outpaced their white counterparts. But how would young black voters hold those they had put in office accountable? And what were their demands?
This group, coming together under the banner Black Youth Project 100 (“BYP100” for short), was tasked with figuring that out. As with any large gathering, people disagreed, cliques were formed, and tensions began to mount. The organizers struggled to build consensus within this diverse group of academics, artists and activists. And then George Zimmerman was acquitted. The energy in the room changed.
“A moment of trauma can oftentimes present you with an opportunity to do something about the situation to prevent that trauma from happening again,” said Charlene Carruthers, one the activists at the conference.
Carruthers, a Chicago native, has been an organizer for more than ten years, starting as a student at Wesleyan University. She has led grassroots and digital campaigns for, among others, the Women’s Media Center, National People’s Action and ColorofChange.org. She heard all types of sounds emanating from the people in the room that day, from crying to screaming. “I don’t believe the pain was a result, necessarily, of shock because Zimmerman was found not guilty,” Carruthers said, “but of yet another example…of an injustice being validated by the state—something that black people were used to.”
Some members of BYP100 went into the streets of downtown Chicago and led a rally. Others stayed behind and drafted the group’s first collective statement. Addressed to “the Family of Brother Trayvon Martin and to the Black Community,” it read in part: “When we heard ‘not guilty,’ our hearts broke collectively. In that moment, it was clear that Black life had no value. Emotions poured out—emotions that are real, natural and normal, as we grieved for Trayvon and his stolen humanity. Black people, WE LOVE AND SEE YOU.”
The group recorded a reading of the letter and released the video on July 14, one day after the verdict. “That was the catalyst,” Carruthers said, “that cemented [the idea] that the people in that room had to do something collectively moving forward.”
…
The demise of the Black Panther Party in the mid-1970s left a void in black political organizing. The Panthers weren’t without problems (the sexist nature of their leadership was a big one), but they represented the last gasps of a national black organizing that combined radical political education, direct action, youth engagement and community services. In the years since, racial-justice groups have struggled to effect change as profound as they managed to achieve during the heyday of the civil-rights and Black Power movements. The Rev. Al Sharpton’s National Action Network is mostly visible to the extent that Sharpton is able to leverage his own platform and personality for the causes he cares about. The same is true of the Rev. Jesse Jackson and his Rainbow PUSH Coalition. Until Benjamin Jealous took over as president in 2008, the NAACP—the nation’s oldest civil-rights organization—was battling perceptions of irrelevance. Under Jealous’s leadership, the NAACP changed course, but the question lingered as to whether it was equipped to fight the new challenges faced by black America. The Malcolm X Grassroots Movement has existed since 1993 without much fanfare; the National Hip-Hop Political Convention, started in 2004, fizzled. “The times we live in,” Carruthers said, “call for a resurgence of national black-liberation organizing.”
This past May, I traveled to Chicago for the “Freedom Dreams, Freedom Now!” conference, hosted by a number of organizations, including BYP100, on the campus of the University of Illinois at Chicago. The conference was intended as an “intergenerational, interactive gathering” of scholars, artists and activists commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of Freedom Summer and discussing contemporary social-justice organizing. The opening plenary featured a keynote address by Julian Bond, a co-founder of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and former board chair of the NAACP. He presented a history of Freedom Summer, the SNCC-led movement to register voters and get black people to the polls in Mississippi, before a premiere screening of the PBS documentary Freedom Summer, directed by Stanley Nelson.
But the aim of the conference wasn’t just to reminisce. It was a precursor to Freedom Side, a collective that includes members of BYP100, the Dream Defenders and United We Dream, an immigrant-youth-led organization, as well as more established groups like the NAACP and AFL-CIO. Before the conference, as part of the Freedom Summer celebration, the Dream Defenders hosted “freedom schools” throughout Florida, talking to young people about criminalization, mass incarceration and the school-to-prison pipeline. Voter registration drives were also held across the country.
The day after the conference ended, BYP100 hosted an organizer-training event at the University of Chicago. Early on, the attendees were split into two groups, and the two sides engaged each other in a call-and-response chant that referenced historical greats like Nat Turner, Angela Davis, Ida B. Wells, Mumia Abu-Jamal and Fred Hampton. But even as they paid homage to their history in song, these young activists had their eyes on the future. Members led sessions on personal narratives in organizing, how to handle interactions with police officers, and building political power.
Read full article here

thepeoplesrecord:

How Trayvon Martin’s death launched a new generation of black activism
August 29, 2014 | Mychal Denzel Smith | The Nation

On July 13, 2013, George Zimmerman was found not guilty in the murder of Trayvon Martin, an unarmed African-American 17-year-old walking home from a 7-Eleven. What The Washington Post and other media outlets had dubbed “the trial of the century” was over, with a deeply unsettling verdict. In the fifteen months between Trayvon’s death and the beginning of the trial, people across the country had taken to the streets, as well as to newspapers, television and social media, to decry the disregard for young black lives in America. For them—for us—this verdict was confirmation.

A group of 100 black activists, ranging in age from 18 to 35, had gathered in Chicago that same weekend. They had come together at the invitation of Cathy J. Cohen, a professor of political science at the University of Chicago and the author of Democracy Remixed: Black Youth and the Future of American Politics, and her organization, the Black Youth Project. Launched in 2004, the group was born as a research project to study African-American youth; in the decade since then, Cohen has turned the BYP into an activist organization. The plan for this meeting was to discuss movement building beyond electoral politics. Young black voters turned out in record numbers in the 2008 and ‘12 elections: 55 percent of black 18-to-24-year-olds voted in 2008, an 8 percent increase from 2004, and while a somewhat smaller number—49 percent—voted in 2012, they still outpaced their white counterparts. But how would young black voters hold those they had put in office accountable? And what were their demands?

This group, coming together under the banner Black Youth Project 100 (“BYP100” for short), was tasked with figuring that out. As with any large gathering, people disagreed, cliques were formed, and tensions began to mount. The organizers struggled to build consensus within this diverse group of academics, artists and activists. And then George Zimmerman was acquitted. The energy in the room changed.

“A moment of trauma can oftentimes present you with an opportunity to do something about the situation to prevent that trauma from happening again,” said Charlene Carruthers, one the activists at the conference.

Carruthers, a Chicago native, has been an organizer for more than ten years, starting as a student at Wesleyan University. She has led grassroots and digital campaigns for, among others, the Women’s Media Center, National People’s Action and ColorofChange.org. She heard all types of sounds emanating from the people in the room that day, from crying to screaming. “I don’t believe the pain was a result, necessarily, of shock because Zimmerman was found not guilty,” Carruthers said, “but of yet another example…of an injustice being validated by the state—something that black people were used to.”

Some members of BYP100 went into the streets of downtown Chicago and led a rally. Others stayed behind and drafted the group’s first collective statement. Addressed to “the Family of Brother Trayvon Martin and to the Black Community,” it read in part: “When we heard ‘not guilty,’ our hearts broke collectively. In that moment, it was clear that Black life had no value. Emotions poured out—emotions that are real, natural and normal, as we grieved for Trayvon and his stolen humanity. Black people, WE LOVE AND SEE YOU.”

The group recorded a reading of the letter and released the video on July 14, one day after the verdict. “That was the catalyst,” Carruthers said, “that cemented [the idea] that the people in that room had to do something collectively moving forward.”

The demise of the Black Panther Party in the mid-1970s left a void in black political organizing. The Panthers weren’t without problems (the sexist nature of their leadership was a big one), but they represented the last gasps of a national black organizing that combined radical political education, direct action, youth engagement and community services. In the years since, racial-justice groups have struggled to effect change as profound as they managed to achieve during the heyday of the civil-rights and Black Power movements. The Rev. Al Sharpton’s National Action Network is mostly visible to the extent that Sharpton is able to leverage his own platform and personality for the causes he cares about. The same is true of the Rev. Jesse Jackson and his Rainbow PUSH Coalition. Until Benjamin Jealous took over as president in 2008, the NAACP—the nation’s oldest civil-rights organization—was battling perceptions of irrelevance. Under Jealous’s leadership, the NAACP changed course, but the question lingered as to whether it was equipped to fight the new challenges faced by black America. The Malcolm X Grassroots Movement has existed since 1993 without much fanfare; the National Hip-Hop Political Convention, started in 2004, fizzled. “The times we live in,” Carruthers said, “call for a resurgence of national black-liberation organizing.”

This past May, I traveled to Chicago for the “Freedom Dreams, Freedom Now!” conference, hosted by a number of organizations, including BYP100, on the campus of the University of Illinois at Chicago. The conference was intended as an “intergenerational, interactive gathering” of scholars, artists and activists commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of Freedom Summer and discussing contemporary social-justice organizing. The opening plenary featured a keynote address by Julian Bond, a co-founder of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and former board chair of the NAACP. He presented a history of Freedom Summer, the SNCC-led movement to register voters and get black people to the polls in Mississippi, before a premiere screening of the PBS documentary Freedom Summer, directed by Stanley Nelson.

But the aim of the conference wasn’t just to reminisce. It was a precursor to Freedom Side, a collective that includes members of BYP100, the Dream Defenders and United We Dream, an immigrant-youth-led organization, as well as more established groups like the NAACP and AFL-CIO. Before the conference, as part of the Freedom Summer celebration, the Dream Defenders hosted “freedom schools” throughout Florida, talking to young people about criminalization, mass incarceration and the school-to-prison pipeline. Voter registration drives were also held across the country.

The day after the conference ended, BYP100 hosted an organizer-training event at the University of Chicago. Early on, the attendees were split into two groups, and the two sides engaged each other in a call-and-response chant that referenced historical greats like Nat Turner, Angela Davis, Ida B. Wells, Mumia Abu-Jamal and Fred Hampton. But even as they paid homage to their history in song, these young activists had their eyes on the future. Members led sessions on personal narratives in organizing, how to handle interactions with police officers, and building political power.

Read full article here

(via america-wakiewakie)

August282014
August272014

sixpenceee:

Informal infographic depicting evolution 

(via rawr0609)

8PM
“What is, so to speak, the object of abolition? Not so much the abolition of prisons but the abolition of a society that could have prisons, that could have slavery, that could have the wage, and therefore not abolition as the elimination of anything but abolition as the founding of a new society.” Fred Moten & Stefano Harney, “University and the Undercommons” (via softvulgarities)

(Source: todoelajo, via nuanced-subversion)

8PM
8PM
vegan-veins:

Diet for a new world, May all be fed by John Robbins

vegan-veins:

Diet for a new world, May all be fed by John Robbins

(via rawr0609)

8PM
antiprolife:

alwayspro-choice:

thebigmaybe:

cheshiregoneinsane:

art-is-the-word:

latinagabi:

isaiah-50-7:

nikosnature:

teachingtotransform:

Another NYC billboard…
This one is messed up!


I agree.
It IS messed up that that billboard is stating a FACT. The fact that over one half of all African American pregnancies end in abortion. The fact that 80+% of abortion mills are in minority neighborhoods. 
It IS messed up.
And yet WE are the racist ones.

yes, you are the racist ones.where are you after those brown babies are born? do you speak up when they’re hunted down and beaten by the police? do you speak up against a system that systematically works to oppress them, making the decision to have a child so much harder because having a child is so much more than giving birth? are you going to help pay for their healthcare? schooling? housing? food? Where are you when it comes to discussing why the fuck is the system made so that PoC have less access to a better education, financial aid, work etc. Don’t pretend to care about brown babies when they’re beaten and killed every day and you people are no where to be found.  Racist piece of shit. 

Reblogging for trrruuuth

latinagabi dropping them truth bombs

reblogging for that paragraph ^^

A few years ago, I read an article where the mother of this child was actually upset at how her daughter’s photo was used.
Here it is: http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/mother-girl-featured-shocking-anti-abortion-billboard-outraged-ad-apology-article-1.135168

Reminder that the claim that 80% of abortion clinics are located in minority neighborhoods is a complete and utter lie propagated by anti-choicers. The real percentage of abortion clinics located in predominantly black neighborhoods is 9%.
63% are located near neighborhoods that are made up of mostly non-hispanic white people. [x]
But of course instead of maybe taking a look at the reason many PoC seek out abortions, anti-choicers would rather make up statistics and cry “I’m not racist! Pro-choicers are racist because they let PoC make their own decisions!” 
(I also love that these kinds of statements come straight from people who will appropriate tragedies like slavery, genocide, or the murder of PoC and pretend they’re equivalent to abortion. So not racist.) 

antiprolife:

alwayspro-choice:

thebigmaybe:

cheshiregoneinsane:

art-is-the-word:

latinagabi:

isaiah-50-7:

nikosnature:

teachingtotransform:

Another NYC billboard…

This one is messed up!

I agree.

It IS messed up that that billboard is stating a FACT. The fact that over one half of all African American pregnancies end in abortion. The fact that 80+% of abortion mills are in minority neighborhoods. 

It IS messed up.

And yet WE are the racist ones.

yes, you are the racist ones.
where are you after those brown babies are born? do you speak up when they’re hunted down and beaten by the police? do you speak up against a system that systematically works to oppress them, making the decision to have a child so much harder because having a child is so much more than giving birth? are you going to help pay for their healthcare? schooling? housing? food? Where are you when it comes to discussing why the fuck is the system made so that PoC have less access to a better education, financial aid, work etc. 
Don’t pretend to care about brown babies when they’re beaten and killed every day and you people are no where to be found.  
Racist piece of shit. 

Reblogging for trrruuuth

latinagabi dropping them truth bombs

reblogging for that paragraph ^^

A few years ago, I read an article where the mother of this child was actually upset at how her daughter’s photo was used.

Here it is: http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/mother-girl-featured-shocking-anti-abortion-billboard-outraged-ad-apology-article-1.135168

Reminder that the claim that 80% of abortion clinics are located in minority neighborhoods is a complete and utter lie propagated by anti-choicers. The real percentage of abortion clinics located in predominantly black neighborhoods is 9%.

63% are located near neighborhoods that are made up of mostly non-hispanic white people. [x]

But of course instead of maybe taking a look at the reason many PoC seek out abortions, anti-choicers would rather make up statistics and cry “I’m not racist! Pro-choicers are racist because they let PoC make their own decisions!” 

(I also love that these kinds of statements come straight from people who will appropriate tragedies like slavery, genocide, or the murder of PoC and pretend they’re equivalent to abortion. So not racist.) 

(via rawr0609)

8PM

autisticlynx:

research something for months or even years and you’ll be told you’re not qualified to self-diagnose, despite knowing more about your specific conditions than your average therapist

mention you have a trigger and suddenly those same people become experts in exposure therapy without any prior research or consent

(via rawr0609)

8PM
rs620:

"Being black is not a crime." South Sudanese and Eritrean refugees protest against prosecution in Tel Aviv, Israel 

rs620:

"Being black is not a crime." South Sudanese and Eritrean refugees protest against prosecution in Tel Aviv, Israel 

(via rawr0609)

August232014

fisadeepforestgreen:

annanstans:

Today in Malmö people have been protesting against the nazis in Svenskarnas Parti. The police went crazy, as usual, and rode over people several times, hit them in the head, and so on, all the things police usually do. Nowadays the nazis don’t even have to do the dirty work themselves, they just need a demonstrations permit. 



The police have blood on their hands.

Acab forever. 

Antifascism is self defense. 

No Pasaran.

I normally don’t post stuff like this because I want my blog to be my haven. But this happened today in my town, Malmö, in Sweden. There is no haven.

The police protect an openly neo-nazi party whose chummy associates attacked and stabbed feminists and anti-fascists on March 8th earlier this year, leaving one of them hospitalised fighting for his life. They run anti-fascist protesters down with cars and horses, with little regard for potential losses. Only through sheer luck did noone get killed today. 10 people were injured.

The spokeswoman for the police, Ewa-Gun Westford, blames the protesters and another spokesperson lied to the press, claiming that the protesters had attacked the medical staff who later arrived, but only after they had been detained by the police. The police also roped off the emergency entrance of the hospital, declaring § PL 24 and banning “activists”, demanding IDs and declaration of business from random people needing medical care.

Meanwhile, the Svenskarnas Parti-nazis were given a police escort to their next meeting point.

(via ragemovement)

7PM
7PM
ragemovement:

manshamer:

afro-dominicano:

darvinasafo:

Just like in the Eric Garner situation…

these people need to be heard and defended.

holy shit they actually charged him w filing a false police report bc they didnt like what he said


Police sending the message to the people “you saw what we saw or you didn’t see anything at all”

ragemovement:

manshamer:

afro-dominicano:

darvinasafo:

Just like in the Eric Garner situation…

these people need to be heard and defended.

holy shit they actually charged him w filing a false police report bc they didnt like what he said

Police sending the message to the people “you saw what we saw or you didn’t see anything at all”

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